Cracking Code for Primary Students

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Cracking Code for Primary Students

From kindergarten to the twelfth grade, our children are consuming technology at an alarming rate, but do they know how it works?

“We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.” – Carl Sagan

Carl Sagan voiced his concern at the growing disconnection between the users and creators of technology in his last interview in 1996. Two decades later, it seems that this warning has remained unheeded. Smart technology and the Internet of Things promise a world of convenience, with devices that cater to our every whim. We are, however, increasingly perplexed by how these devices work, and our kids are being left with no clue as to how to develop such technologies themselves.

Computational thinking does not require an immediate mastery of modular arithmetic and Boolean expressions for students to develop their technological literacy. Mathematically speaking, computer science starts with the act of being logical.

In response to the growing illiteracy in science and technology, it is of the utmost importance that education seeks to bridge this gap. Many technologists argue that it is, in fact, not a very big gap to fill. Computational thinking does not require an immediate mastery of modular arithmetic and Boolean expressions for students to develop their technological literacy. Mathematically speaking, computer science starts with the act of being logical.

In our Bitesize Coding and Computing series, produced by the BBC, short animations “break down the problem” of learning to code through engaging, animated shorts that explicitly explain the basic tenets of computational thinking to a young audience. While remaining accurate to the methods required to successfully develop algorithms and implement their execution, clear language and humour are used to ensure that children are able to grasp these important concepts.

Discover how the internet works, how data is stored, and what you need to know to start making your own applications and games, in this exciting and important series!

Further activities

 

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