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The Victorian Department of Education and Training chooses ClickView as their video learning solution for all secondary and P-12 schools

ClickView and the Victorian Department of Education have partnered to provide all secondary and P-12 schools access to ClickView.

The Department was looking for a solution to provide high quality content to support the curriculum and further enable schools to boost student engagement through interactive learning.

With ClickView already being used in over 50% of Victorian schools, we look forward to assisting the state as a whole in driving learning outcomes through video.
Continue reading “The Victorian Department of Education and Training chooses ClickView as their video learning solution for all secondary and P-12 schools”

ClickView’s Great Expectations – Behind the Scenes

Recently added to our Curriculum Library for Secondary Schools is a series we’re very excited to release, Great Expectations. This exclusive series is designed for Middle to Senior Secondary students and explores key elements of Charles Dickens’ classic Victorian novel. Our team of educators have specifically chosen to produce this series as it is a popular novel for literature studies in Australian schools.

Our ClickView Productions Team have put together this video to take you behind the scenes of ClickView’s Great Expectations. Watch the video below to meet the team, see where the series was filmed and how they built the sets.

What makes this series different to other programmes about Great Expectations?

Most videos about a novel or play are adaptations of the original work. Where ClickView Original Productions differ, in particular our latest series Great Expectations, is that we are focusing on the analysis of the novel – just as teachers and students are doing. We look at exactly what the Australian Curriculum outlines as requirements for literature studies, and we directly address that information in our programmes.

For example, all English literature content descriptors in Australia identify the skills and knowledge that a novel study should help students develop. This specifically includes an understanding of the writer’s historical, social and cultural contexts; characters and their motivations; identifying themes, and evaluating a writer’s style and language choices.

This is why the Great Expectations series is broken into four shorter programmes – each tackling these important aspects of study. Additionally, all programmes come with a selection of worksheets and activities for students to complete, as well as the ClickView Interactive Video which provides another way to assess student understanding.

What additional resources are available for ClickView’s Great Expectations?

Each programme comes with a set of comprehension questions that can be used to help students note key programme information about the novel. The other activities provide a range of diverse activities so teachers can choose what best suits the needs of different classes and individual students. In this series that includes:

  • Creating a picture essay of the Victorian era.
  • Writing a ‘missing chapter’ from the novel about Magwitch’s experiences in Australia.
  • Analysis of how theme is revealed through plot, setting and characters.
  • Setting novel scenes to music to convey mood.

How can I watch this programme?

If you are subscribed to ClickView, this programme is available in our Curriculum Library for Secondary Schools. If your school does not have access to ClickView you can request a demo today.

Latest Updates to Interactive Videos, ClickView Exchange, and more

In my last post, What’s New in ClickView Online Version 5, I detailed some of the bigger, more notable changes that we have just released in ClickView, such as the new interactive videos.

In addition to this, the team have been hard at work on many other powerful feature additions and changes that deserve the light of day. Some have been requested directly from the ClickView Community, so I know you have been waiting for these and can’t wait to get your hands on them.

Without further ado, here is ClickView Online Version 5.2! Continue reading “Latest Updates to Interactive Videos, ClickView Exchange, and more”

ClickView: The Zaption Alternative for Interactive Videos

Some big news in the world of educational videos hit the airwaves last week – Zaption has been acquired by Workday and will “shut down” their service starting on 30th September 2016.

Over the last years, Zaption has done a stellar job in strengthening video’s place in education, whether it be the classroom or the office, in particular the development of their interactive video functionalities. We congratulate Zaption on their work and their exciting acquisition.

To current Zaption users, we would like to offer you a free trial of the ClickView platform so you can continue to make interactive videos. Continue reading “ClickView: The Zaption Alternative for Interactive Videos”

What’s New in ClickView Online Version 5 – Interactive Videos and More

There’s been a lot going on recently at ClickView as our team busily prepared for the launch of ClickView v5. The good news is that the latest release is now available for all ClickView customers. As ClickView Online’s Head of Development, I wanted to provide a quick overview of the changes you will find when you now log into ClickView. Continue reading “What’s New in ClickView Online Version 5 – Interactive Videos and More”

TV for Teachers Top 5: Discover the cutting edge of science and explore the people behind the big issues

Welcome to the third episode of ClickView and Screenright’s new webseries – TV for Teachers Top 5 where each Wednesday we’ll be releasing our picks of the best educational programs from free-to-air tv over the past week.

The best part is they’re all available on ClickView TV – a free service where teachers can view and download videos for their classroom – powered by ClickView and Screenrights.

If you’re already a ClickView customer you can access these videos through the ClickView Exchange, copy them to your personal workspace and push them in to your school’s ClickView library.

TV for Teachers Top 5 aims to bring a new way for teachers to find resources to keep their lessons engaging and to make learning with videos easy. Whether it’s introducing a new topic, exploring a current affair or flipping your classroom, video can be a great way to enhance media-rich learning in your classroom and free-to-air television is a goldmine of educational content.

This week we’ll explore the personal stories behind some of the biggest social and political issues of the 21st Century and discover how the cutting edge of science is changing our understanding of the human body and the medicine we use. Check it out!

Gayby Baby

This week SBS showed the controversial Australian documentary ‘Gayby Baby’ in conjunction with this week’s upcoming Mardi Gras – giving the debate that has divided a nation a new voice. This documentary is a portrait of four Australian kids – Gus, Ebony, Matt and Graham – whose parents all happen to be gay. As they wrestle with the challenges of oncoming adolescence, the outside world debates the issue of marriage equality and whether or not kids like them are at risk. This program covers what has been a contentious subject across Australia, but it is a great way to show the people behind the issues and is suitable for units in society and culture and PDH classes. There are study guides available for this program from ATOM available online.

Afghanistan: Inside Australia’s War

You can also use the available ATOM study guide for the first episode of ABC’s new miniseries ‘Afghanistan: Inside Australia’s War”. This program shows Australia’s longest war – from 9/11 to the current day – from the perspective of our fighting men and women.  Through interviews and battle footage Australian soldiers reveal their war whilst it is still ringing in their senses. This documentary series contains coarse language, violence and war footage from the front lines – so may be only suitable for secondary students studying History, Politics and International Relations.

Catalyst – ‘Out of Africa’

This week’s episode of Catalyst follows Professor Vanessa Hayes as she visits the most genetically diverse people in the world in Namibia to trace the roots of humanity’s family tree to better understand the human genome. By investigating the extreme genetic diversity of the people of the Calahari desert for the first time, Professor Hayes exposes some startling truths about inequality in modern medicine and how researching these people could unlock a new medical future for us all.

The Diet Myth

The Diet Myth is another program that pulls apart our understanding of conventional wisdom in the medical field and reveals unknowns about the human body. This documentary explores how cutting edge research is changing our opinions on bacteria and how the microbes in our gut that we once thought of as our enemy may actually be one of our strongest allies in the fight against obesity. This program is a revealing look into our changing understanding of the human body and our digestive system, and offers a look to the future of diet and medicine.

Insight – ‘Placebo’

This week Insight asks “when it comes to medicine – how much of it is in your mind?” By exploring stories such as athletes achieving personal bests or test patient’s increased pain threshold both thanks to the use of placebos, SBS’ forum-style program investigates the strength of the placebo effect and how best it can be used to treat pain, sleep and nausea in actual patients. This episode is a good way to investigate the structure of scientific and psychological studies with your class and to reveal a look inside the strength of perception when it comes to the human mind through the eyes of experts from around the world.

If you are a customer you can access these programs as well as over 20,000 educational titles as part of the ClickView Exchange.

Not already part of the ClickView community? You can access these titles and many more on ClickView TV.

If you have any suggestions of programs from free-to-air TV over the past week that you think would be a great resource for teachers, feel free to contact tvforteachers@clickview.com.au

TV for Teachers Top 5: Explore changing cultures and discover unheard stories from WW2

ClickView and Screenrights are proud to announce that we’ve been working together to bring you the first episode in our new webseries – TV for Teachers Top 5. Each Wednesday we’ll release our picks of the best educational programs from free-to-air TV over the past week.

The best part is they’re all available on ClickView TV – a free service where teachers can view and download videos for their classroom – powered by ClickView and Screenrights.

If you’re already a ClickView customer you can access these videos through the ClickView Exchange, copy them to your personal workspace and push them in to your school’s ClickView library.

TV for Teachers Top 5 aims to bring a new way for teachers to find resources to keep their lessons engaging and to make learning with videos easy. Whether it’s introducing a new topic, exploring a current affair or flipping your classroom, video can be a great way to enhance media-rich learning in your classroom and free-to-air television is a goldmine of educational content.

This week we explore some of the unheard stories from before and after World War 2 and view the changing cultures of Australian Aboriginals in the 1950’s and modern Chinese people. Check it out!

WW2: 1942 and the Soft Underbelly
This documentary examines British campaigns in North Africa and Italy during World War 2, seeking to determine why forces were so heavily deployed in these areas when the War was against a German foe. Labelled the “soft underbelly” of the War by Winston Churchill, this documentary questions the accuracy of such a statement.

Berlin Wall: The Night the Iron Curtain Fell
The construction of the Berlin Wall was a momentous political gesture, cutting off West Berlin from East Berlin and Germany. This program follows the accounts of eye witness journalist Adam Kellet-Long as he documents the night the wall was raised. This is an excellent resource for Modern History students for placing the events of the Cold War in context.

Jedda
This film from the 1950s provides interesting insight into the attitudes and perspectives toward Indigenous culture in this period of Australia’s history. “Jedda” broke new ground in its era, as it was the first Australian film to star two Indigenous actors. The writing and the story, however, reveal the extent to which racism pervaded mainstream Australian society decades ago.

Real Chinese: Home and Family
This program blends the study of Chinese language and geography, with a focus on how Western values and trends are beginning to influence the views and attitudes of its population. This resource is perfect for Chinese language studies, while also enabling students to gain a more comprehensive understanding into contemporary Chinese life and culture.

Terms and Conditions May Apply
This informative program discusses the legality and consequences of the information we voluntarily submit online. From tracking our searches to using our personal information, large companies such as Google and Facebook often hide what people sign up to in their terms and conditions. Including interviews with Google Engineer Ray Kurzwil and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, this program will encourage students to consider their internet privacy and safety before immediately clicking the accept button while online.

 

If you are a customer you can access these programs as well as over 20,000 educational titles as part of the ClickView Exchange.

Not already part of the ClickView community? You can access these titles and many more on ClickView TV.

If you have any suggestions of programs from free-to-air TV over the past week you think would be a great resource for teachers feel free to contact tvforteachers@clickview.com.au

Romeo and Juliet: Why We Need to Celebrate Its Minor Characters

The study of Shakespeare is a long-standing tradition in literary education, and most of us leave high school well-versed in the Bard’s themes and characters. Whether it’s “To be or not to be?” that causes us to question the very point of our existence, or the quick-witted Bottom that introduces us to the risqué humour of innuendo, Shakespeare often leaves a marked impact on our understanding of language and meaning itself.

As educators, one of our greatest challenges is teaching such canonical material in new and exciting ways.

Romeo and Juliet is, perhaps, Shakespeare’s most celebrated play. Its universal themes of love, tragedy and sacrifice speak to both young and old; its titular characters remaining the quintessence of forbidden romance, centuries after they were first penned.

As educators, one of our greatest challenges is teaching such canonical material in new and exciting ways. We at ClickView are creating new content to this end; providing teachers with fresh ways to engage today’s students.

The Director - This is Shakespeare

ClickView’s This Is Shakespeare is a four part series that provides insight into the themes, dramatic techniques and characters that come to life in popular Shakespearean works. It approaches the complexity of Romeo and Juliet in a novel manner.

In Romeo and Juliet – Minor Characters, Tybalt, Juliet’s nurse and Friar Laurence are placed on centre stage. The program’s analysis of Romeo and Juliet moves beyond the much discussed relationship of the play’s protagonists, to reveal how the Bard uses theatre to contend with Renaissance perspectives on gender, family, and doubt. The prejudices and values that were held by Shakespeare and his contemporaries are unpacked in an engaging parody of the amateur theatre scene.

Love, of course, is a salient point of deliberation, but duality and fate also feature heavily in how the play unfolds.

Romeo and Juliet: Minor Characters – The Nurse


As our video illustrates, the Nurse juxtaposes the ideal of youth and femininity portrayed by Juliet. The character voices the objections of the spurned woman: an archetype used commonly in Renaissance depictions of femininity. In doing so, Shakespeare problematises the adoption of either extreme; Juliet’s naivety and the Nurse’s disillusionment ultimately prove to be destructive qualities.

Thematically, Romeo and Juliet is a rich source for understanding the human condition. Love, of course, is a salient point of deliberation, but duality and fate also feature heavily in how the play unfolds. The enmity between circumstance and free will reaches dizzying heights in the play’s conclusion, but it is the play’s minor characters that foreshadow the imminence of tragedy and, ultimately, renewal.

Discussion Questions

  • Compare how women are depicted in Romeo and Juliet by comparing the characters of Juliet, the Nurse, and Rosaline. How do these women reflect Renaissance gender stereotypes? What is Shakespeare attempting to say about these stereotypes?
  • The idea of fate in Romeo and Juliet coincides with inevitability. To what extent do you believe this to be true? Do you think Romeo and Juliet were truly star-crossed and doomed to die, or do you think that they have, instead, suffered the consequences of their hasty actions? Explain your answer.

 

Further Activities

  • Write a scene between the Nurse and Juliet, set in the modern world. Consider how the Nurse’s role might fit into a contemporary understanding of the “spurned woman”. Similarly, consider how Juliet’s role might fit into a contemporary understanding of feminine naivety.

 

ClickView flips learning on its head with interactive videos

Challenge for video learning

The biggest road block to showing videos to a class, whether it is a kindergarten or year 12 class, is maintaining student engagement. It can’t be monitored, it wastes valuable class time and it is difficult to prevent.

We recognised this as a challenge for our schools worldwide and have come up with a solution.

Introducing interactive videos

ClickView Interactive Videos come with built-in questions and additional resources. Whilst watching students will be presented with questions about the video content and are encouraged to answer them before continuing, making them a valuable formative assessment tool. Not only do our interactive videos increase the need for students to engage with the information presented, but they break up watching time. This encourages them to think, learn, understand and question further, not just watch and switch off.

Recent studies have observed that “student engagement” is more than a single concept. [1] It relies on the students’ motivation to learn, their participation in discussion and classwork, their understanding of academic concepts and how much they interact with classmates and teachers.

Flipped learning with ClickView
ClickView Interactive Videos are the perfect opportunity to start flipping your classroom.

Increase student engagement

Recent studies have observed that “student engagement” is more than a single concept. [1] It relies on the students’ motivation to learn, their participation in discussion and classwork, their understanding of academic concepts and how much they interact with classmates and teachers.

ClickView Interactive Videos touch on each of these: The video content is lively and interesting, providing motivation for the student. Teachers can look at the answers given by students and alter lesson plans based on their class’ understanding. Students can also watch videos at home before coming to class, encouraging a flipped classroom where they have more time to interact with their students and teachers in class.

See it for yourself

These videos are included as part of your ClickView subscription. If you are not a ClickView customer, feel free to request a demo and we would be more than happy to come to your school and show you how our interactive videos can help improve learning outcomes.

 

[1] Henrie, Curtis R; Halverson, Lisa R; Graham, Charles R.Measuring student engagement in technology-mediated learning: A Review[2015] Computers & Education Journal 1 December 2015, Volume 90, p36-53